Monday, July 6, 2009

Beached Blue Toenails & Rose-Colored Glasses


My apologies from the get-go. I read illustrated books, I work with illustrated books, I enjoy illustrated books, I study illustrated books, I adore illustrated books. It's quite natural for me to sit in a lawn chair the beach and view my world as an illustrated book.


Some scuff and say, "She looks at the world through rose-colored glasses."


Probably I do. Yes, I do. And I've learned that it's a much better way to look at life.
Some are born with perfect vision. They see the joyful, rosy hues that are fleeting and scattered like rose petals off the rose, on the ground. Some are prescribed these magical glasses early in life. Others are prescribed these glasses later in life and, when the Great Optometrist hands out these prescriptions, many reject them. Glasses are a nuisance, afterall, and other people judge your appearance. But those who accept that their vision is less than perfect and wear these glasses will see things more clearly and be grateful for the clarity God has given them. Because they wear these glasses they see this brief life as magical, holy, endearing, worthy...not less precise, but more illuminated.


Those who choose not to see life with an illuminated precision can leave their glasses in the sand. That's okay...for them...but don't throw sand in the rest of our eyes. We will simply wipe our glasses clean, replace them and be happy that we can find the beauty in all the things that God has made un-ugly...right down to the blue toenails in the sand.







And the rosy-red sweetness of watermelons on the 4th of July.

3 comments:

  1. Wonderful reflection, Cay. I truly enjoyed it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aww man! I wish I could have gone! =[ But sadly, I had work.
    Glad Ya'll Had FUN!

    ~Meg

    ReplyDelete
  3. We missed you, Meg!
    Oma and I talked about our annual "girls trip". Don't forget to plan ahead for next April. :-)

    ReplyDelete

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