Friday, July 6, 2012

Spreading Our Writing on the Table

I am waiting to hear back on a children's book that has been on the "table" since August last year. I heard from the editor last Thursday. My book is still on the "table". As long as it's on that metaphoric "table" rather than my kitchen table, I stand a 50/50 chance of being served a contract. For now, I'm enjoying the appetizing possibilities.

I'm really hoping they serve me a contract. Would be lovely.

Today as I read this interview (http://jennifergivhan.com/mother-writers-conversations-with-successful-contemporary-women-writers-who-are-also-moms/) shared by Melissa Wiley, I pondered the life of writers who are mothers, especially mothers with large families. Honestly I think I was more productive when there was a baby in my house. Great procrastinator that I am, I believe it had something more to do with putting off changing the smelly diaper than wanting to publish anything. I'm thinking that perhaps when grand babies need babysitting, my productivity level will increase to great heights.

It's something I'd love to discuss with other mother-writers out there. Specifically, how do you claim your writing time, especially when the family views reading and computer time as one's form of procrastination over cooking dinner or cleaning house?

"To be a successful writer, you have to have time — long before you ever make a dime or publish a damn thing — you need time. Period. Having children makes this harder. Time shrinks. It has to be fought for. A mother who writes has to demand time. If she isn’t given time, she will not progress as a writer."~ Julianna Baggott

2 comments:

  1. The issue of time is so difficult. I also used to be more productive when I had a baby - but that was simply because I had more time (thanks to naps, early bedtimes.) Now I have a teenager who doesn't go to bed until at least 10pm. Mothering duty may be less intense now but it lasts longer. And how do I justify sitting working at my computer when I am constantly saying, "get off that computer and do something else?" I know it should be easily justified - I am working - but it doesn't look that way to a teenager!

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  2. Sarah,
    Exactly!

    And I'm afraid stressing over it is mentally draining and emotionally exhausted. Perhaps that is what sucks away at my productivity.

    Is there a button one can press to turn off the patronizing voices within our heads???

    Thank you for commenting. :-)

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